necessary-sass:

curlybrownboy:

belindapendragon:

kobetyrant:

HOW IS THIS NOT EVERYWHERE?

Reblogging this good news…again.

y’all know EXACTLY why this isn’t everywhere. don’t pretend to be oblivious

Well let’s spread the word then guys. This kid deserves all the attention.

(Source: lawdgevus)

gelopanda:

breezebloops:

Bomba is an Afro-Puerto Rican folkloric music style developed throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries by west African slaves brought to the island by the Spanish. It is a communal activity that still thrives in its traditional centers of Loíza, Santurce, Mayagüez, Ponce, and New York City. The traditional musical style has been diffused throughout the United States following the Puerto Rican Diaspora, especially in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, California, and Florida. It also became increasingly popular in Peru, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, and has largely influenced Afro-Latino music styles within these countries.
More than just a genre of music, it’s most defining characteristic is the encounter and creative relationship between dancers, percussionists, and singers. Dance is an integral part of the music. It is popularly described as a challenge/connection, or an art of “call and answer,” in which two or more drums follow the rhythms and moves of the dancers. The challenge requires great physical shape and usually continues until either the drummer or the dancer discontinues.
There are several styles of bomba, and the popularity of these styles varies by region. There are three basic rhythms, as well as many others that are mainly variations of these: Yubá, Sicá and Holandés. Other styles include Cuembé, Bámbula, Cocobalé, and Hoyomula.

❤️❤️❤️❤️ mi gente
gelopanda:

breezebloops:

Bomba is an Afro-Puerto Rican folkloric music style developed throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries by west African slaves brought to the island by the Spanish. It is a communal activity that still thrives in its traditional centers of Loíza, Santurce, Mayagüez, Ponce, and New York City. The traditional musical style has been diffused throughout the United States following the Puerto Rican Diaspora, especially in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, California, and Florida. It also became increasingly popular in Peru, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, and has largely influenced Afro-Latino music styles within these countries.
More than just a genre of music, it’s most defining characteristic is the encounter and creative relationship between dancers, percussionists, and singers. Dance is an integral part of the music. It is popularly described as a challenge/connection, or an art of “call and answer,” in which two or more drums follow the rhythms and moves of the dancers. The challenge requires great physical shape and usually continues until either the drummer or the dancer discontinues.
There are several styles of bomba, and the popularity of these styles varies by region. There are three basic rhythms, as well as many others that are mainly variations of these: Yubá, Sicá and Holandés. Other styles include Cuembé, Bámbula, Cocobalé, and Hoyomula.

❤️❤️❤️❤️ mi gente
gelopanda:

breezebloops:

Bomba is an Afro-Puerto Rican folkloric music style developed throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries by west African slaves brought to the island by the Spanish. It is a communal activity that still thrives in its traditional centers of Loíza, Santurce, Mayagüez, Ponce, and New York City. The traditional musical style has been diffused throughout the United States following the Puerto Rican Diaspora, especially in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, California, and Florida. It also became increasingly popular in Peru, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, and has largely influenced Afro-Latino music styles within these countries.
More than just a genre of music, it’s most defining characteristic is the encounter and creative relationship between dancers, percussionists, and singers. Dance is an integral part of the music. It is popularly described as a challenge/connection, or an art of “call and answer,” in which two or more drums follow the rhythms and moves of the dancers. The challenge requires great physical shape and usually continues until either the drummer or the dancer discontinues.
There are several styles of bomba, and the popularity of these styles varies by region. There are three basic rhythms, as well as many others that are mainly variations of these: Yubá, Sicá and Holandés. Other styles include Cuembé, Bámbula, Cocobalé, and Hoyomula.

❤️❤️❤️❤️ mi gente
gelopanda:

breezebloops:

Bomba is an Afro-Puerto Rican folkloric music style developed throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries by west African slaves brought to the island by the Spanish. It is a communal activity that still thrives in its traditional centers of Loíza, Santurce, Mayagüez, Ponce, and New York City. The traditional musical style has been diffused throughout the United States following the Puerto Rican Diaspora, especially in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, California, and Florida. It also became increasingly popular in Peru, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, and has largely influenced Afro-Latino music styles within these countries.
More than just a genre of music, it’s most defining characteristic is the encounter and creative relationship between dancers, percussionists, and singers. Dance is an integral part of the music. It is popularly described as a challenge/connection, or an art of “call and answer,” in which two or more drums follow the rhythms and moves of the dancers. The challenge requires great physical shape and usually continues until either the drummer or the dancer discontinues.
There are several styles of bomba, and the popularity of these styles varies by region. There are three basic rhythms, as well as many others that are mainly variations of these: Yubá, Sicá and Holandés. Other styles include Cuembé, Bámbula, Cocobalé, and Hoyomula.

❤️❤️❤️❤️ mi gente
gelopanda:

breezebloops:

Bomba is an Afro-Puerto Rican folkloric music style developed throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries by west African slaves brought to the island by the Spanish. It is a communal activity that still thrives in its traditional centers of Loíza, Santurce, Mayagüez, Ponce, and New York City. The traditional musical style has been diffused throughout the United States following the Puerto Rican Diaspora, especially in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, California, and Florida. It also became increasingly popular in Peru, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, and has largely influenced Afro-Latino music styles within these countries.
More than just a genre of music, it’s most defining characteristic is the encounter and creative relationship between dancers, percussionists, and singers. Dance is an integral part of the music. It is popularly described as a challenge/connection, or an art of “call and answer,” in which two or more drums follow the rhythms and moves of the dancers. The challenge requires great physical shape and usually continues until either the drummer or the dancer discontinues.
There are several styles of bomba, and the popularity of these styles varies by region. There are three basic rhythms, as well as many others that are mainly variations of these: Yubá, Sicá and Holandés. Other styles include Cuembé, Bámbula, Cocobalé, and Hoyomula.

❤️❤️❤️❤️ mi gente
gelopanda:

breezebloops:

Bomba is an Afro-Puerto Rican folkloric music style developed throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries by west African slaves brought to the island by the Spanish. It is a communal activity that still thrives in its traditional centers of Loíza, Santurce, Mayagüez, Ponce, and New York City. The traditional musical style has been diffused throughout the United States following the Puerto Rican Diaspora, especially in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, California, and Florida. It also became increasingly popular in Peru, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, and has largely influenced Afro-Latino music styles within these countries.
More than just a genre of music, it’s most defining characteristic is the encounter and creative relationship between dancers, percussionists, and singers. Dance is an integral part of the music. It is popularly described as a challenge/connection, or an art of “call and answer,” in which two or more drums follow the rhythms and moves of the dancers. The challenge requires great physical shape and usually continues until either the drummer or the dancer discontinues.
There are several styles of bomba, and the popularity of these styles varies by region. There are three basic rhythms, as well as many others that are mainly variations of these: Yubá, Sicá and Holandés. Other styles include Cuembé, Bámbula, Cocobalé, and Hoyomula.

❤️❤️❤️❤️ mi gente
gelopanda:

breezebloops:

Bomba is an Afro-Puerto Rican folkloric music style developed throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries by west African slaves brought to the island by the Spanish. It is a communal activity that still thrives in its traditional centers of Loíza, Santurce, Mayagüez, Ponce, and New York City. The traditional musical style has been diffused throughout the United States following the Puerto Rican Diaspora, especially in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, California, and Florida. It also became increasingly popular in Peru, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, and has largely influenced Afro-Latino music styles within these countries.
More than just a genre of music, it’s most defining characteristic is the encounter and creative relationship between dancers, percussionists, and singers. Dance is an integral part of the music. It is popularly described as a challenge/connection, or an art of “call and answer,” in which two or more drums follow the rhythms and moves of the dancers. The challenge requires great physical shape and usually continues until either the drummer or the dancer discontinues.
There are several styles of bomba, and the popularity of these styles varies by region. There are three basic rhythms, as well as many others that are mainly variations of these: Yubá, Sicá and Holandés. Other styles include Cuembé, Bámbula, Cocobalé, and Hoyomula.

❤️❤️❤️❤️ mi gente
gelopanda:

breezebloops:

Bomba is an Afro-Puerto Rican folkloric music style developed throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries by west African slaves brought to the island by the Spanish. It is a communal activity that still thrives in its traditional centers of Loíza, Santurce, Mayagüez, Ponce, and New York City. The traditional musical style has been diffused throughout the United States following the Puerto Rican Diaspora, especially in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, California, and Florida. It also became increasingly popular in Peru, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, and has largely influenced Afro-Latino music styles within these countries.
More than just a genre of music, it’s most defining characteristic is the encounter and creative relationship between dancers, percussionists, and singers. Dance is an integral part of the music. It is popularly described as a challenge/connection, or an art of “call and answer,” in which two or more drums follow the rhythms and moves of the dancers. The challenge requires great physical shape and usually continues until either the drummer or the dancer discontinues.
There are several styles of bomba, and the popularity of these styles varies by region. There are three basic rhythms, as well as many others that are mainly variations of these: Yubá, Sicá and Holandés. Other styles include Cuembé, Bámbula, Cocobalé, and Hoyomula.

❤️❤️❤️❤️ mi gente

gelopanda:

breezebloops:

Bomba is an Afro-Puerto Rican folkloric music style developed throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries by west African slaves brought to the island by the Spanish. It is a communal activity that still thrives in its traditional centers of Loíza, Santurce, Mayagüez, Ponce, and New York City. The traditional musical style has been diffused throughout the United States following the Puerto Rican Diaspora, especially in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, California, and Florida. It also became increasingly popular in Peru, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, and has largely influenced Afro-Latino music styles within these countries.

More than just a genre of music, it’s most defining characteristic is the encounter and creative relationship between dancers, percussionists, and singers. Dance is an integral part of the music. It is popularly described as a challenge/connection, or an art of “call and answer,” in which two or more drums follow the rhythms and moves of the dancers. The challenge requires great physical shape and usually continues until either the drummer or the dancer discontinues.

There are several styles of bomba, and the popularity of these styles varies by region. There are three basic rhythms, as well as many others that are mainly variations of these: Yubá, Sicá and Holandés. Other styles include Cuembé, Bámbula, Cocobalé, and Hoyomula.

❤️❤️❤️❤️ mi gente

did-you-kno:

Oprah Winfrey grew up in poverty, was raped at age 9 and 13, ran away from home, and gave birth at 14 to a son who died soon after, but still went on to become the world’s 1st African American billionairess. Source

So many reasons I love women

(Source: prettylittleliarsquestions)

Some people look at it as this horrible thing, & will look at you & ask “wow you chose to struggle that long? Why didn’t you get your shit together”. Sometimes that is the strongest choice a person can make. To continue to struggle if it means not giving up on their dreams, & helping those around them. Struggle on, only the strong can hold on through it all.

uptownsown-carpediem:

Bless bomber jacket w/fur lining smh….so Beast

😍

huffingtonpost:

My Beautiful Woman based on a true story. 

Think twice before you judge a parent. 

(Source: youtube.com)

supamuthafuckinvillain:

blasianxbri:

baddest-femalee:

huffpostlive:

Charlo “F—-k it, I quit” Greene Lights A Joint Live On Air
After announcing she was leaving her job at the KTVA station in Anchorage, Alaska, by telling viewers, “F—k it, I quit,” she joined HuffPost Live on Thursday and smoked a joint live on the air.
"I’ll spark up right now. It is what it is. I’m in the privacy of my own home."
So yes, that happened.

✝

holy. lol


Can I pls marry her. supamuthafuckinvillain:

blasianxbri:

baddest-femalee:

huffpostlive:

Charlo “F—-k it, I quit” Greene Lights A Joint Live On Air
After announcing she was leaving her job at the KTVA station in Anchorage, Alaska, by telling viewers, “F—k it, I quit,” she joined HuffPost Live on Thursday and smoked a joint live on the air.
"I’ll spark up right now. It is what it is. I’m in the privacy of my own home."
So yes, that happened.

✝

holy. lol


Can I pls marry her. supamuthafuckinvillain:

blasianxbri:

baddest-femalee:

huffpostlive:

Charlo “F—-k it, I quit” Greene Lights A Joint Live On Air
After announcing she was leaving her job at the KTVA station in Anchorage, Alaska, by telling viewers, “F—k it, I quit,” she joined HuffPost Live on Thursday and smoked a joint live on the air.
"I’ll spark up right now. It is what it is. I’m in the privacy of my own home."
So yes, that happened.

✝

holy. lol


Can I pls marry her. supamuthafuckinvillain:

blasianxbri:

baddest-femalee:

huffpostlive:

Charlo “F—-k it, I quit” Greene Lights A Joint Live On Air
After announcing she was leaving her job at the KTVA station in Anchorage, Alaska, by telling viewers, “F—k it, I quit,” she joined HuffPost Live on Thursday and smoked a joint live on the air.
"I’ll spark up right now. It is what it is. I’m in the privacy of my own home."
So yes, that happened.

✝

holy. lol


Can I pls marry her.

supamuthafuckinvillain:

blasianxbri:

baddest-femalee:

huffpostlive:

Charlo “F—-k it, I quit” Greene Lights A Joint Live On Air

After announcing she was leaving her job at the KTVA station in Anchorage, Alaska, by telling viewers, “F—k it, I quit,” she joined HuffPost Live on Thursday and smoked a joint live on the air.

"I’ll spark up right now. It is what it is. I’m in the privacy of my own home."

So yes, that happened.

holy. lol

Can I pls marry her.

damnnlyssa:

everytime it gets close to October i start reblogging the fuck out of this

damnnlyssa:

everytime it gets close to October i start reblogging the fuck out of this

(Source: excuse-my-beauty)